Brilliant! Grow Food, Not Lawns

May 3rd, 2015

This recent post by one of the contributors at Grow Food Not Lawns demonstrates one of the most sensible and rewarding ways to move away from water-guzzling lawns and towards a more secure, resilient and abundant food system. 

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March 31st, 2015

Early plowing of the Nile River floodplain made sense as new silt and fertility was deposited every year.

Kill your rototiller and save the soil (and planet)

It's time to prepare garden beds for planting.  The best planting soil is light and fluffy, full of air and with all plant residue removed.  Right?  That's what we have learned from industrial agriculture practices and rototiller advertising.  But these practices can reduce productivity and can be destructive to soil health and thus human health.  Over-tilling of farmland and garden systematically kills soil life and forces us to replace natural nutrients with chemicals fertilizers.

After over 200 years of industrialized agriculture and decades of "green revolution" chemical agriculture what is the health of our soils, and our farming and food system? Is farming more or less sustainable… economically, nutritionally and environmentally?  Are we behaving as if the health of the soil is directly linked to our health and that of the natural world?  Do we act as if the majority of the human-caused greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere result from cutting down forests, paving wetlands, overgrazing pastures and over-working farmland?  All these questions must be answered in the negative.

Fortunately, there is a growing movement in commercial agriculture called "no-till farming" that aims to mimic the way soils are actually formed.   Read the rest of this entry »

Snakes on a Plane!? Try worms on a plane…

March 2nd, 2015

A friend of mine works half the year in Vermont as a State Park Ranger and the other half of the year (when VT is coldest) she lives in Cost Rica where she dedicates herself to the rescue and protection of dogs.  She has brought many homeless street dogs back to the US for a better life.

I get involved in animal protection in Costa Rica too, especially sea turtles and Howler monkeys.  We have plenty of snakes here as well but they are not quite so compelling.  In fact. the photo above is of a semi-poisonous (to mice and lizards more than humans) 6 ft Lyre snake that I interrupted while it was eating a two ft iguana that lived on our roof.  The iguana died and I relocated snake.

snake eating iguana compost story will raap in costa rica

The gardeners in the development in Costa Rica that I started and where I also live are compost green season leaves and trimmings from our 220 acres. There now is enough kitchen waste to start a separate food waste comporting operation.  So, I began looking for red wiggler worms as our food waste composting helpers.

 

 

Red wigglers are used in Costa Rica coffee processing operations to help digest the pulp (the skin surrounding the coffee bean) and make it into organic fertilizer and soil amendments,  But the coffee growing region is 5-6 hrs from us.  Plus, I knew of some red wigglers in VT that wanted a new home, far away from the most brutal winter temperatures in 100 years.

But how to get my new compost helpers to Costa Rica from VT?

I googled “red worms on a plane” and got some good advice: the TSA does no prohibit them.  So, I loaded the adventurous worms into a plastic container with moist coffee grounds and yesterday’s salad so it could pass as my lunch in case Costa Rica officials got curious.  The container went into my backpack so the worms would not freeze in the luggage compartment.  We took off to Costa Rica.

As we flew over Lake Nicaragua and began descending toward the Liberia airport in Costa Rica I noticed my backpack had turned over and worms had escaped through the air holes.  Some were exploring the floor and others were heading up the wall toward the airplane window.  The unsuspecting tourist next to me was still sleeping but the flight attendants were about to start the last collection of service items

I had minutes to collect the 2-3 dozen worms.  The immigration form was just thin enough and also stiff enough to scoop up and corral the slithering escapees.  Back into yesterday’s salad they went.

Now these ‘extranjero’ compost helpers are happily eating local mangos, bananas, star fruit, and melons, plus coffee grounds, tortillas and old rice and beans.  They will never need to worry about freezing again.